The case for the transportation industry Class Action on Meal Allowances against Revenue Canada.

For the past thirty-three years, various groups and individuals have attempted to rectify unfair meal allowance claims. Business pays the bills but comes up short when it deals with the federal government on just about every issue. In this case, the problem is road meals and incidentals when one travels to earn their living.

Federal civil servants including the Military and RCMP are entitled to travel allowances and benefits that far exceed that of a taxpayer in the private sector.

Before March 2002, the private sector employee could claim $33.00 per day for road meals and incidentals. Then Revenue Canada would claw back half of these funds. As of October 2004, the private sector entitlement wass half of $45.

The Class Action against Revenue Canada (CRA) was launched by the law firm of Johnston, Johnson & Company, of Summerland, BC in March 2002

The graph below gives a comparison on the difference in the rates received by a federal civil servant and a private sector employee for equal time spent on the road.

February 2007—The transportation industry Class Action on Meal Allowances against Revenue Canada

was denied by the Supreme Court of Canada.

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Year

Trucker, Salesmen, Bus Driver Meals and Incidental Allowance

Federal Civil Servant Meals & Incidental Allowance

1994

5,781.38

16,485.69

1995

5,838.78

16,826.30

1996

5,451.18

16,254.42

1997

6,268.42

18,900,22

1998

6,444.00

19,860.00

1999

9,411.85

21,183.00

2000

6,539.50

23,520.68

2001

6,766.74

26,221.40

Total

$52,501.85

$159,251.71